Tiger Feathers

no human being would stack books like this.
Marianne Dages, Equivalents, gelatin silver prints, 2014

Marianne Dages, Equivalentsgelatin silver prints, 2014

gazophylacium:

Dionysos and Agathos Daimon (“Good Spirit”), genius of the soil around Vesuvius, Pompeii.

gazophylacium:

Dionysos and Agathos Daimon (“Good Spirit”), genius of the soil around Vesuvius, Pompeii.

(via moon-thing)

euliss:

Ayan Farah, Site Specific Installations
Untitled, 2006. Mikiko Hara

Untitled, 2006. Mikiko Hara

Cy Twombly, Forest, Lexington, 2000

Cy Twomby, Sunset, Gaeta, 2008

via Une Collecte

the-drawing-center:

THROWBACK THURSDAY! An exhibition of drawing-based works by the late American artist Ree Morton (1936 –1977), was on view in the Main Gallery and Drawing Room from September 18 – December 18, 2009. Ree Morton: At the Still Point of the Turning World highlighted Morton’s influential body of work, remarkably all produced in a single decade between her decision to turn to art full-time in the late 1960s and her tragic death in an automobile accident in 1977, shortly before her 41st birthday.

While reflecting many of the currents of post-Minimal art of the 1970s, Morton’s work also looked to a pioneering use of personal narrative, intimacy, humor, and poetic imagination. Yet the scope of her artistic production remains largely unrecognized, as does her vital contribution to feminist art practice and the importance of drawing to her development as an artist. The exhibition was comprised of a selection of early drawings, several of which were on view for the first time, along with major drawing-based sculptural works and a selection of notebook sketches. 

Ree Morton: At the Still Point of the Turning World was curated by João Ribas, taking its title from a T. S. Eliot poem Morton kept above her studio desk.   

Images:

Ree Morton, Line Series, 1974. Watercolor, crayon and pencil on paper, 22 1/4 x 30 inches. Estate of Ree Morton, Courtesy of Alexander and Bonin, New York and Annemarie Verna Galerie, Zurich. 

Ree Morton, Pink Numbers, 1971. Mixed media on paper, 8 1/2 x 11 inches. Courtesy of Alexander and Bonin, New York. 

Ree Morton, Untitled (Woodgrain, Currents in a Stream), 1974. Watercolor and pencil on printed paper, 19 x 25 inches. Private Collection, NY. 

Ree Morton, Untitled, 1972. Ink on vellum, 19 3/4 x 30 inches. Estate of Ree Morton, Courtesy of Alexander and Bonin, New York and Annemaries Verna Galerie, Zurich. 

Ree Morton, Untitled (Woodgrain, Three Pink Cells), 1974. Watercolor, crayon and pencil on paper, 19 x 25 inches. Collection of Barbara and David Karron, Los Angeles. 

farisjewelry:

Matisse
continuo-docs:

Bob Cobbing – Poetry Into Music, published by London: Writers Forum, 1986 [source: Flickr]

continuo-docs:

Bob CobbingPoetry Into Music, published by London: Writers Forum, 1986 [source: Flickr]

(via boxforstanding)